Tuesday, 31 May 2016

BURMA - Market Mini-Series

Burma holds a very special place in my heart for very personal reasons. Yet, despite this, I have only visited the country as an adult on a couple of extremely brief occasions.

The first time was during my first trip to Thailand. We travelled north from Bangkok to visit Chiang Mai and then continued up to the Thai/Burmese border at Mae Sai.

We crossed to Tachilek in Burma and took a rickshaw to see the pagoda which presides over the town. In the pagoda grounds we met this lady selling books among other things.






Back in the town we took a stroll through the street market. To be frank, I prefer food markets, but in their absence I'll take whatever I can get. However, it does affect how many photos I take!




My second, equally brief visit to Burma was when I was on an extended visit to Thailand and needed to renew my Thai visa. This meant I had to leave and re-enter Thailand. Crossing the Thai border into Burma is a popular option.


We travelled up Thailand's west coast to Ranong where we took a boat across to Burma.
Longtail boats, as in this picture, ferry people across too.

During the crossing we couldn't help but notice that the sea was swarming with enormous jellyfish.







The lack of activity on the quays was notable.











Until I came upon this area where those big jellyfish had been harvested and were now being processed. This wasn't strictly a market as I don't think the jellyfish were being offered for sale, but I'm using a bit of artistic licence here. 
Sadly I was unable to glean much information due to the language barrier, but my understanding was that after cleaning the jellyfish they are salted and dried in order to preserve them. Whilst you can see the salt crystals in the photo, fortunately for you, you can't smell the jellyfish!




What do you think? Have you ever tried or would you fancy some reconstituted jellyfish?

See you next week.




33 comments:

  1. I've never tried it, but my love for any and all freshwater fish and seafood almost insures that I'd like reconstituted jellyfish!

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    1. Well, I too love seafood, so I would probably like the taste - but I'm not sure if I'd like the texture!

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  2. Oh I must say I don't think I'm up for the giant jellyfish! I'm curious how they are prepared for meals. It also must have been extraordinary to see them in the ocean!

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    1. I believe they have to be soaked before adding to meals, Sue - and then only in small quantities. I preferred seeing them in the water. :)

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  3. I know most jelly fish have a poisonous sting so not sure I would want to eat that. My friend went over to live for winters and loved it. he told me how he had to cross over to get his visa stamped. The colours and smells look so rich from what my friend told me.

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    1. I imagine any stingers would be removed at the processing stage, Birgit. The whole of South East Asia is vivid and wonderful - but it depends a lot on how you travel and your personal comfort zone level. In other words - it can sometimes be a bit of a challenge for soft Westerners. :)

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  4. Boring of me, I know, but I think I'll pass :) Better left to adventurers like Sue.

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    1. Not boring at all, Jo... you know what you like. :)

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  5. No fresh or reconstituted jellyfish for me! They promise not to sting me; I promise not to eat them!

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    2. No I don't blame you, they didn't exactly look appealing, Roland, and they smelt pretty awful. :)

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  6. Urgh! No... and I can't bear seeing octopuses eaten because they are so intelligent. If we can harvest jelly fish it would be a good food source as they are proliferating due to the fact that we are - er - putting a lot of poo and other nitrogen fertilisers etc into the water. However, as they are 90% water themselves i'm not keen to try one!

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    1. That's interesting, Liz - I didn't know jellyfish were proliferating because of what we're putting in the water. Hmmm - I might have to digress next week with a post dedicated to jellyfish!

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  7. In answer to your question - not in a million years! Though I suppose there must be some nourishment even in these creatures, the idea is horrible.

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    1. Can't say fairer than that, Liz! :)

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  8. I'm gagging just from the picture, so there's your answer. I look at that and wonder about those people's lives. What are they like? What kind of comforts/conveniences do I take for granted that they've never known? It's mind boggling.

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    1. Most of the rest of the world live very different lives to us, Crystal. I've travelled fairly extensively in undeveloped countries or countries that are just plain 'different' to how I was brought up in England and it's a constant source of interest and fascination to me.

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  9. You had me up to the jelly fish. I've eaten squid and urchins and they were good.

    @Kathleen01930 Blog

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  10. I'm used to seeing squid - or 'calamari' - on western menus - but I've never tried urchins, Kathleen. Would they be comparable to oysters, I wonder?

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  11. I'll pass on reconstituted jellyfish, if it's all the same to you.

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  12. I think it might be an acquired taste, Patsy.

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  13. Another pace I aught to add to my list. Reading your posts is costing me a fortune!As for the recon jellyfish, I'm sure I've eaten worse so I'd certainly give it a go.

    Visit Keith's Ramblings

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  14. After what you've already admitted to eating, Keith, I should think reconstituted jellyfish would be a walk in the park! :)

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  15. I'm not sure salted jellyfish would be on my agenda... or menu! ;-)

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  16. Nor mine - they're far more attractive when they're alive!

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  17. Not so sure I would enjoy jellyfish...but I would enjoy visiting Burma someday :)

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  18. Hi Keith - yes, I too really want to visit this country - but I want to do it independently and extensively and I'm not sure that's possible yet.

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  19. I should have said: I too really want to visit this country properly...

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  20. Somehow jellyfish does not appeal at all! But, then again, I'm sure that there are others who don't think of snails as an attractive food (while I think that they are quite tasty!)

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    1. That's so true, Tracy. It really is all down to perception. I tried a snail once - under pressure - and it literally made me gag. :(

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  21. I am not sure if would ever prefer having jellyfish!
    Srivi| The Piscean Me

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    1. I think the only way I'd try jellyfish is if it was sufficiently disguised in a dish of other food!

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